MUSEUM COMPLEX ON THE WARSAW CITADEL/ THE MUSEUM OF POLISH HISTORY

TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT:              PUBLIC USE

INVESTOR:     THE MUSEUM OF POLISH HISTORY

LOCATION:    WARSAW, ŻOLIBORZ DISTRICT, CITADEL, DYMIŃSKA STREET

DATE:             2016- 2017

GROSS VOLUME:  OK. 432 340 m3

TOTAL AREA:         OK. 53 688 m2

NET AREA:             OK. 44 700 m2

COOPERATION:     WSP, RS ARCHITEKTURA KRAJOBRAZU

GROUND FLOORS:                    4

UNDERGROUND FLOORS:        1

NUMBER OF PARKING PLACES FOR ALL COMPLEX:   691

TEAM:
SZCZEPAN WROŃSKI
PAWEŁ GRODZICKI
KATARZYNA BILLIK
KRZYSZTOF BUDZISZ
KAMIL CEDZYŃSKI
ANNA DOBEK
MAŁGORZATA GILARSKA
BEATA GŁAZ
MARCIN JURUSIK
LUDWIK KAIZERBRECHT
MARCIN KRUK
PAULINA KUCHARSKA
ANNA MAJEWSKA
KRZYSZTOF MARCISZEWSKI
ADAM MIERZWA
MARIUSZ NIEMIEC
MAGDALENA NOWAK
MAGDALENA J. NOWAK
BARBARA POŁCZYŃSKA
MICHAŁ STANISZEWSKI
ŁUKASZ SZCZEPANOWICZ
KAJETAN SZOSTOK
KRYSTIAN TOMCZYK
PAWEŁ WOLANIN
MICHAŁ ŻUREK

 

2018•03•30

 

THE MUSEUM OF POLISH HISTORY WILL BE ONE OF THE MOST MODERN MUSEUMS IN POLAND AND IN EUROPE, WITH EXPECTED ANNUAL VISITOR FIGURES OF AROUND  500,000.
IT WILL BE A PLACE FOR MULTIDIMENSIONAL CONTACT WITH POLISH HISTORY, A PLACE FOR REFLECTION AND DISCUSSION, FOR ACQUIRING KNOWLEDGE AND COMING INTO CONTACT WITH CULTURE – A SOCIAL HUB

The building’s architecture comprises a very consciously built narration. Etched in stone in contemporary form, it is a tale of the layering of history, of discoveries, and of the uncovering of manifold meanings of the past, of openness, and of freedom   ̶  the watchword of the Museum. The stone structure will refer to the build-up of time forging the very matter of history. The large windows on the exhibition floor and glazed openings between the ground floor “city” blocks extending into a network of interrelated spaces within its interiors are a materialisation of the concept of openness and friendliness of the Museum, of discoveries, of multidimensional approaches to history, of the freedom of choice of paths of cognition, and of creating personal narrations. The glazed openings in the building’s facade are also a way of communicating to the surroundings any ongoing activities taking place in various parts of the Museum. Light, both natural, flooding in from the outside through the structure’s openings, and artificial, comprises one of the key tools in shaping the Museum’s atmosphere, penetrating and visually joining its internal spaces.

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